3244 Brookside Rd 
Suite 140 
Stockton, CA 95219

Lifestyle Read Time: 3 min

A House Divided

The latest research suggests that divorce rates in the U.S. have been falling in recent decades. Still, many people face the difficult crossroads that comes when their marriage ends.1

Getting a divorce is often a painful, emotional process. Don’t be in such a hurry to reach a settlement that you make poor decisions that can have life-long consequences. If divorce is a possibility, here are a few financial ideas that may help you prepare.

The most important task you can do is get your finances organized. Identify all your assets and make copies of important financial papers, such as deeds, tax returns, and investment records. When it comes to dividing up your assets, consider mediation as a low-cost alternative to litigation. Most states have equitable-distribution laws that require shared assets to be divided 50/50 anyway. When a divorce becomes contentious, attorney’s fees can accumulate.

From a financial perspective, divorce means taking all the income previously used to run one household and stretching it out over two residences, two utility bills, two grocery lists, etc. There are other hidden costs as well, such as counseling for you or your children. Divorces also may require incurring one-time fees, such as a security deposit on a rental property, moving costs, or increased child care.

Finally, dividing assets may sound simple, but it can be quite complex. The forced sale of a home or investment portfolio may have tax consequences. Potential tax liability also can make two seemingly equal assets have varying net values. Additionally, when pulling apart a portfolio, it makes sense to consider how each asset will suit the prospective recipient in terms of risk tolerance and liquidity.

Remember, the information in this article is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

During a divorce, many factors compete for attention. By understanding a few key concepts, you may be able to avoid making costly financial mistakes.

1. CDC.gov, 2022

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

 

Related Content

SECURE Act 2.0: An Overview

SECURE Act 2.0: An Overview

The second iteration of the SECURE Act brings forward several changes to the world of retirement.

Protecting Your Business from the Loss of a Key Person

Protecting Your Business from the Loss of a Key Person

Business owners may be able to protect themselves from the financial consequences of losing a key employee.

Four Steps to Valuing an Estate

Four Steps to Valuing an Estate

Determining the value of your estate, or for someone who has passed away, can be a complex undertaking.

 

Have A Question About This Topic?







Thank you! Oops!

The Five Basics of Financial Literacy

How literate are you when it comes to your finances? Brush up with these five basics.

Will Power

Preparing for the eventual distribution of your assets may not sound enticing. But a will puts the power in your hands.

Asset Allocation

Consider how your assets are allocated and if that allocation is consistent with your time frame and risk tolerance.

View all articles

What Is My Life Expectancy?

Estimate how many years you may need retirement assets or how long to provide income to a surviving spouse or children.

Assess Your Life Insurance Needs

This calculator estimates how much life insurance you would need to meet your family's needs if you were to die prematurely.

Comparing Investments

This calculator compares the net gain of a taxable investment versus a tax-favored one.

View all calculators

Retirement Redefined

Around the country, attitudes about retirement are shifting.

Should You Ever Retire?

A growing number of Americans are pushing back the age at which they plan to retire. Or deciding not to retire at all.

Stay Safe with a B.O.P. At Your Back

Learn about the advantages of Business Owner Policies with this highly educational and fun animated video.

View all videos